Read Write Inc

Dear Parents/Carers,

As you are aware, reading is a high priority for improvement across the school. I am really pleased to announce we have invested in a new reading scheme called ‘Read Write Inc.’ which we will begin straight after half term. Read Write Inc. uses a structured and repetitive way of teaching phonics which enables children to read accurately and fluently with good comprehension.  

The children in KS1 and Lower KS2 have been assessed and split into small groups where they will work on their reading, phonics and writing every morning and every afternoon from Monday to Thursday.

 We will continue to send home our school reading books, alongside any Read Write In. books too. Please continue to hear your child read every day, as this is the very best way to support them. We kindly ask you to also continue to record their reading progress in their record books as your comments and feedback helps us in school!

 Our aim is to improve reading across our school and together we can achieve this through:

 

  • Daily Read Write Inc. sessions in school
  • Encouraging children to develop a love of books by reading to them daily, at home and at school
  • Giving children access to a wide range of books and reading experiences at school and at home

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What is RWI phonics?

Read Write Inc (RWI) is a phonics based programme which helps children learn to read whilst also developing a wide range of vocabulary and encouraging a love of stories. It was developed by Ruth Miskin and more information on this can be found at: www.ruthmiskinliteracy.com

 Who is Read Write Inc. for?

The Read Write Inc. programme is for primary school children learning to read. Children will begin the programme in Year R and will remain on the programme until they are reading at the expected level for their year. Our aim is for most children to be off the scheme by the end of Year 2, however some children will remain on the scheme in Years 3 and 4.

 How will it work?

Year R children will be taught a sound a day and will be assessed regularly by their class teachers. When they have reached an appropriate level they will be grouped according to their reading level, and will be taught for up to half an hour a day, where they will start reading and writing alongside learning the new sounds.

 KS1 and Lower KS2

All children who are working at or below a National Curriculum level will be assessed regularly by their Read Write Inc teacher. The children will complete reading activities for half an hour every morning and half an hour every afternoon from Monday to Thursday. They are grouped according to their reading level, this means children will be grouped according to their stage not their age, so some classes could be mixed and taught by different teachers/teaching assistants. A few children who need a bit more extra support to maintain progress will work with a teaching assistant for an extra 10 minutes a day but we will inform you of this should your child need it.

 How do we know RWI works?

Schools embedding this programme have been recognised by OFSTED in the HMI ‘Reading by Six Report’ (November 2010) as an example of how the best schools teach reading.

 What does the RWI teaching process look like?

We start by teaching phonics. This means childen learn how to ‘read’ the sounds in words and how those sounds can be written down. This is essential for reading, but it also helps children learn to spell well. We teach the children simple ways of remembering these sounds and letters.

The children also practise reading (and spelling) what we call ‘tricky words’, such as ‘once,’ ‘have,’ ‘said’ and ‘where’.

The children practise their reading with books that match the phonics and the ‘tricky words’ they know. They start thinking that they can read and this does wonders for their confidence.

The teachers read to the children, too, so the children get to know all sorts of stories, poetry and information books. They learn many more words this way and it also helps their writing.

 How can I help my child at home?

  • Establish a routine to include reading regularly throughout the day and the week.
  • Have fun with the Fred talk at home e.g. where is your c-oa-t? Time for b-e-d!
  • Encourage your child to “Fred Talk” or sound out any unfamiliar words
  • Recognise “red words” together- “Remember you can’t Fred a red! “
  • Comment on your child’s Home School Journal to keep a dialogue going with the class teacher
  • Read as many stories to your child as you can. Traditional tales, stories from other cultures, poetry, their favourite story- talk about the stories with them
  • Explain the meaning of new words.
  • Most importantly show the fun that can be gained by listening to stories!

 

For more information please go to:

 https://www.ruthmiskin.com/en/find-out-more/parents/

 https://youtu.be/sjlPILhk7bQ

 https://youtu.be/lFyDwUKSw7Y

 https://youtu.be/iHMl70ZmxIQ

READING AT ANTINGHAM & SOUTHREPPS PRIMARY SCHOOL

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 This information will explain the phonics teaching that your son / daughter will receive daily at school during their time in EYFS, KS1 and Lower KS2. It also provides information on how you can help support your son’s /daughter’s phonics development at home. If you need clarification or would like to know more about our phonics teaching, please make an appointment to speak to your son’s/daughter’s class teacher.

 Thank you for your continued support.

 

 The information written in this pamphlet has been gathered from a

variety of sources, including:

www.oxfordowl.co.uk

www.oup.com/oxed/primary/rwi/forparents/

Read Write Inc. Phonics: Home More Phonics Flashcards

 

Before your son/ daughter can start to read, s/he needs to learn to:

  • say the sound that is represented by each letter or groups of letters
  • sound out the word, e.g. c-a-t, sh-o-p, s-t-r-ee-t

 

What are speed sounds?

In Read Write Inc phonics the individual sounds are called ‘speed sounds’ – because we want your son/daughter to read them effortlessly.

 What are ‘speed sounds’ Set 1, Set 2 and Set 3?

Set 1

In Reception your son/daughter learnt the sounds below by sight. They also learnt how to blend them together to read words e.g. c-a-t = cat.

 m, a, s, d, t, i, n, p, g, o, c, k, u, b, f, e, l, h, sh, r, j, v, y, w, th, z, ch,qu, x, ng, nk

 Set 2

(The long vowel sounds.) In KS1 your son/daughter will progress to learning their Set 2 sounds. There are 12 Set 2 ‘speed sounds’ that are made up of two or three letters which represent just one sound, e.g. ay as in play, ee as in tree and igh as in high. It is important that your son/daughter does not pronounce these as 2 or 3 separate sounds. When your son/daughter sees the ‘speed sound’ letters together in a word, s/he must say just one sound for these letters. When your son/daughter learns their Set 2 sounds in school they will

learn:

  • the letters that represent a speed sound e.g. ay
  • a simple picture prompt linked to the ‘speed sound’ and a short phrase to say e.g. may I play

 

Every speed sound has a list of green words linked to it, so your son/daughter can ‘sound out’ and ‘sound blend’ words containing the new speed sound they have just learnt, for example s-p-r-ay = spray.

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 Set 3

Until now your son/daughter will have learnt one way in which each long vowel sound is written (Set 2 sounds). When learning their Set 3 speed sounds they will be taught that there are more ways in which the same sounds are written, e.g. ee as in tree and ea as in tea.

 Set 3 speed sounds reading will be taught for most of Year 1 onwards and Set 3 ‘speed sounds’ spelling during Year 2 onwards. It takes some time for this information to be fully understood by your son/daughter.

 There are 20 Set 3 ‘speed sounds’ that are made up of two or three letters which represent just one sound, e.g. ea as in tea, ow as in cow and are as in care. As before, it is important that your son/daughter does not pronounce these as 2 or 3 separate sounds. When your

son/daughter sees the ‘speed sound’ letters together in a word, s/he must say just one sound for these letters. When your son/daughter learns their Set 3 sounds in school they will

learn:

  • the letters that represent a speed sounds e.g. ea
  • a simple picture prompt linked to the ‘speed sound’ and a short phrase to say e.g. cup of tea
  • Every speed sound has a list of green words linked to it, so your son/daughter can ‘sound out’ and ‘sound blend’ words containing the new speed sound they have just learnt, for example s-p-oil = spoil.

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 It is important that the speed sounds are practised in the correct order. The table above shows you, at a glance, the order of the sounds.

What are green words?

‘Green words’ are words which your son/daughter will be able to ‘go ahead’ and read as they are made up of the speed sounds that s/he will have learnt.

 

RESOURCES FOR HOME USE

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 We do not normally recommend buying flashcards for home use. However, we make an exception with these. They are great cards linked to the phonics scheme we do in school. You could use them with your son/daughter during their time in KS1 and Lower KS2.

They retail at £6.99 however, you can order them from Amazon with free postage for less

than £5.

 A great website that has lots of useful information on it to help you with supporting your son’s/daughter’s maths and reading development is: www.oxfordowl.co.uk/

 GREEN WORDS TO PRACTISE AT HOME

 Please do not practice all these words. Concentrate on one or two sounds at a time and when they know them, move on.12 words a night is ample. Encourage your son/daughter to highlight them when they can read them without sounding.

 Set 2 Sounds

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How to practise Set 3 speed sounds

Remember, only practise Set 3 speed sounds once your son’s/daughter’s knowledge of the Set 2 ‘speed sounds’ is secure. Your son/daughter should know all the Set 2 sounds and the letters that represent them without having to rely on the picture prompt. Example of how to practise Set 3 ‘speed sounds’

  • Review the similar sound from the Set 2 cards e.g. show the ee, what can you see speed card say – ee sound
  • Hold up the letter side of the new speed sound e.g. show the ea letter card say – ea ask your son/daughter to repeat the sound ea
  • Hold up the picture side of the speed sound card e.g. say the phrase ea, cup of tea. Repeat
  • Show your child both sides of the card your son/daughter must say either ea or ea, cup of tea depending on which side you show

 Some cards have three different spellings e.g. ir in bird, ur in burn, and er in fern. It is important you do not introduce all the sounds together for the first time. For the ir ‘speed sound’, practise ir and ur first and then practise er.

 Practise the Set 3 speed sounds in these groups. Those in bold are from Set 3, those not in bold, your son/daughter will have learnt in Set 2.

 oy and oi

ay and a-e (as in make)

igh and i-e (as in smile)

ow and o-e (as in home)

oo and u-e (as in huge)

or and aw

air and are

ir and ur

ay and a-e and ai

ow and o-e and oa

oo and u-e and ew

ire

ure

tion

cious/tious

 Set 3 Sounds

Please do not practice all these words until your son/daughter knows all their Set 2 sounds Concentrate on one sound at a time and when they know it, move on. 6 words a night is ample. Encourage your child to highlight them when they can read them without sounding.

image_08image_09image_10THE YEAR 1 PHONIC SCREENING CHECK

Under ‘normal’ circumstances, the phonics screening check will be taken individually by all children in Year 1, in England. It is designed to give teachers and parents, information on how your son/daughter is progressing in phonics. This year, due to Covid, Year 2 will have their phonics screening check during the second half of the autumn term at the end of November/beginning of December.

 What is the phonic screening check?

There will be two sections in this 40-word check and it will assess phonics skills and knowledge learnt through Reception and Year 1.

 What will it check?

It will check that your son/daughter can: 

  • Sound out and blend sounds in order to read simple words.
  • Read phonically decodable one-syllable and two-syllable words, e.g. cat, sand, windmill.
  • Read a selection of nonsense words which are referred to as pseudo words.

 What are nonsense or pseudo words and why are they included?

These are words that are phonically decodable but are not actual words with an associated meaning e.g. brip, snorb. Pseudo words are included in the check specifically to assess whether your son/daughter can decode a word using phonics skills and not their memory.

 The pseudo words will be shown to your son/daughter with a picture of a monster and they will be asked to tell their teacher what sort of monster it is by reading the word. This not only makes the check a bit more fun,but provides the children with a context for the nonsense word which is independent from any existing vocabulary they may have. Crucially, it does not provide any clues, so your son/daughter just has to be able to decode it.

 Is there a pass mark?

The check is not about passing or failing but checking appropriate progress is being made. Children progress at different speeds so not reaching the threshold score does not necessarily mean there is a serious problem. Your son/daughter will re-sit the check the following summer term.

 What happens to the results?

The school will report your son’s/daughter’s results to you by the end of the summer term as well as to the local authority. If you have any concerns, do talk to your teacher about this in a parents’ meeting or after school.

 Resource for home use

For those of you that have iPads and iPhones at home this is a great APP for your child called: ‘Check your Phonics’ by Pearson Education. This Learn at Home Check your Phonics app is a fun way for children, aged 5-6, to practise their phonics, & get used to the format of the Year 1 phonics check.

 Progression through our reading bands and expected level at the end of each year group. 

 Children who are accessing Read Write Inc. Phonics will receive a second Home-School Reading book which is closely linked to the level that they are on. Some pupils will receive a book from a colour that they have already covered in order to embed their knowledge of certain sounds. The RWI Book band books do not directly link to the NC book banding colours that we are used to using, however the chart below shows where any changes will be made. For example, if your child is currently reading a green banded book, they will be on pink stage for Read Write Inc.

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Our Book Band use Lime not Black

 End of year Reading Expectations

By the end of each year the expected NC book band levels are as follows:

Year Group

Book Band End of Year Expectation

Reception

Yellow

Year 1

Orange

Year 2

Gold

Year 3

Lime

Year 4

Grey

Year 5

Dark Blue

Year 6

Dark Red

 

We hope this guide has explained in some detail how we are implementing and teaching reading and phonics across the school. If you do have any further questions please do not hesitate to contact your child’s class teacher.

 Thank you for your continued support to raise the profile and levels of reading across our school.

 From all the staff at Antingham and Southrepps Primary School